June 2016 President’s Message

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Published on: June 17, 2016

President’s Message

Spring is in full swing.  Calves have been born, crops are in the ground, and there is an air of optimism surrounding many of us as we head into summer. Commencement ceremonies are over and graduation celebrations are underway. It is very enjoyable to watch the latest class of veterinary students work through their last rotations, fighting terrible cases of senioritis and looking forward to their new careers and futures.  It is also a very busy time for many of us in the ET industry, and I hope the season is proving to be prosperous for all of you.

There has not been much activity at the level of the Board of Directors during the last few months; however, committee work has been ongoing, and I would like to highlight some of these activities.

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AETA Certification Advertising

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Published on: June 17, 2016

The Education Committee continues to progress with their activities.  During the strategic planning session that was conducted in February 2013, one of the three focus areas was strengthening the AETA Certification program.  This includes increasing the visibility and value of AETA Certification through marketing the “brand” of Certification.  The Board delegated this marketing task to the Education Committee, and Matt Iager and his fellow committee members have been working with an ad designer to develop a simple, yet eye-catching message about AETA Certification, not just to producers, but also to practitioners.  Keep an eye out for these (shown below) advertisements in a major bovine publication near you!

AETA_March2016_Holstein

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Catching Up: Dr. Clifton Murphy (Doc Murph) at 90!

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Published on: June 17, 2016

Murphy_PhotoI’m writing in response to AETA’s questions regarding how I am doing. I shall try to answer these below.

I am old, and I do not like it. A Biblical quote: “Old men shall dream dreams and the young shall have visions.” I am dreaming dreams about the future. I was born July 9, 1926.

What am I the most proud of:

  • My family
  • My friends: you get to choose your friends—one of the most important choices one can make
  • My military service: no hero—medical service USS LST
  • My older brother: Lt. Dean Murphy, USMC Iwo Jima—resting in Jefferson Barracks
  • My twin brother: injured in World War II
  • My education: BSc Agri, DVM Mo ‘52, MSc Colo. ’60, Post Postdoc, U MO, current
  • My honorary life membership in AETA.
  • The Clifton N. Murphy Scholarship fund in Animal Reproduction–U MO.

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Ask John: Exploding Straws

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Published on: June 17, 2016

Ask John

John F. Hasler

Don’t ask John! Sometimes that is undoubtedly the best option. More than 20 years ago, my then high-school-aged daughter gave me a T-shirt with the caption “To save time, let’s just assume that I know everything.” I still wear it, sometimes even in public. My daughter, who now is an attorney, has often disagreed with my opinions! Most of you will probably not be surprised by that.

Matt, the editor of A Closer Look, asked me to submit a copy of what I recently wrote as a response to a question submitted to the CETA Tech Talk program. Actually, I submitted two responses to Tech Talk on the issue of exploding straws. In my first submission, written in haste and poorly considered, I included the comment “When straws freeze, a vacuum forms inside any air columns as the temperature goes down.” That is really not true. Aqueous fluids, such as cryoprotectant media, expand in volume about 9% when they freeze. Although air does decrease in pressure as it cools, the volume of air in either semen or embryo straws is not large enough to overcome the pressure exerted by the increased volume of the ice.

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Summertime Focus on Water

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Published on: June 17, 2016

Summertime Focus on Water

By: Mid Maryland Dairy Vets

The Blue Mountains were disappearing in the haze.  It was a hazy, hot, and humid day in August and at midday, time to catch the show heifer on pasture for a much-needed drink.  Unfortunately, she had something else in mind, like a game of tag.  After the farmer got close enough to lasso the halter over her head, the heifer took off like a Kentucky Derby Thoroughbred out of the gates.  The chase was on without an ATV or a roping horse and of course asking for help was out of the question.  He was not prepared for this game in sweltering midday heat and humidity.  So after 20 minutes of a full-on chase, the non-athletically gifted caretaker collapsed with exhaustion and dehydration as his vision became blurred and the dreaded cold sweat took over.  With heat stress and exhaustion setting in, he needed to cool down, rehydrate, and then ask for help.

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Food for FSH Thought: Inductions of Superovulation Using Several FSH Regimens In Holstein-Fresian Heifers

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Published on: June 17, 2016

INDUCTIONS OF SUPEROVULATION USING SEVERAL FSH REGIMENS IN HOLSTEIN-FRIESIAN HEIFERS

Yoshiyuki TAKAHASHI and Hiroshi KANAGAWA

(Received for publication, February 2, 1985)

Eighty-three Holstein-Friesian virgin heifers were randomly divided into four groups and superovulated with one of the four FSH regimens as follows: Group 1) twice daily injections of a constant dose of 5 mg of FSH for a period of 4 days, giving a total dose of 40 mg in 8 fractions; Group II) as in Group I with additional 5 mg of FSH on the 5th day, giving a total dose of 45 mg; Group ill) twice daily injections on a decreasing dose regimen of 5, 4, 3 and 2 mg successively for 4 days with the addition of 2 mg of FSH once on the 5th day, giving a total dose of 30 mg; Group N) similar to Group ill, but a mixture of FSH and LH in the ratio of 5: 1 was used, giving a total dose of 30 mg of FSH and 6 mg of LH in 9 fractions. Nonsurgical embryo recovery was performed 7 or 8 days after estrus. Percentage of good embryos in Group II was significantly greater than that in Group I (P < O. 05). There was no significant difference between Groups II and ill in any of the criteria analyzed. Group N was superior to the other groups in superovulation rate and embryo yielding. Significantly greater numbers of total eggs and good embryos were observed in Group N compared to those in Groups I and II (P<0.05). Percentage of the heifers with more than 3 good embryos in Group N was significantly higher than that in Groups I, II and ill (P < O. 05).

Complete article available here: http://eprints.lib.hokudai.ac.jp/dspace/bitstream/2115/2318/1/KJ00002374279.pdf

History Shines New Light on Recipient Care

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Published on: June 17, 2016

History Shines New Light on Recipient Care

By Nate Dorshorst

Portions of this article were originally published in Holstein World 2013 and are reproduced here with their consent.

Recipient management is probably the most overlooked aspect of any embryo transfer program but can probably have the greatest impact on success with a modest financial investment. There is a new emerging science originating from the human realm, which is now becoming heavily investigated at universities throughout the country with significant application to bovine reproduction and genomics. To better understand how this applies to bovine advanced reproduction, it is helpful to understand the historical context leading to its discovery.

The Dutch famine of 1944, also known as the “Hunger Winter,” was a brief but severe famine near the end of World War II when the Germans occupied the Netherlands. In order to punish the Dutch for their reluctance to aid the Nazi war effort, the Germans placed a food embargo to the farming areas in the western region of the Netherlands. This embargo was partially lifted in early November 1944, but unfortunately an unusually early and especially harsh winter had already set in. The canals froze over and became impassable for barges, leaving the cities in the western Netherlands with a scarce food supply. Within a very short time period the food was gone and a population desperate to survive had their diet reduced to bread, potatoes, sugar beets, and tulip bulbs, receiving as little as 400 to 800 calories/day. From September 1944 until early 1945, malnutrition was the primary cause of death of 18,000 Dutch people, and it was considered a contributing factor in the deaths of many more. When the Dutch Famine ended with the liberation of the western Netherlands in May 1945, around 22,000 had died and 4.5 million were otherwise affected.

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AABP Edwin Robertson Beginning Embryo Transfer Seminar

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Published on: June 17, 2016

AABP Edwin Robertson Beginning Embryo Transfer Seminar

August 10–12, 2016

Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

The American Association of Bovine Practitioners (AABP), with support from the American Embryo Transfer Association, will hold a three-day embryo transfer seminar for beginners on August 10 to 12, 2016, at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine in Blacksburg, Virginia. If you want to learn embryo transfer or if you have begun and are struggling, this seminar is for you. You will be taught the most up-to-date techniques by a staff member with years of experience.

For complete details please visit the AABP website.

Save the Date: 2016 AETA and CETA/ACTE Joint Convention

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Published on: June 17, 2016

Save the Date

The 2016 Joint AETA and CETA/ACTE Convention Committee would like to remind you to save the date for the 2016 convention taking place in St. Louis, Missouri, on September 29 to October 1, 2016.

Details can be found on the 2016 AETA and CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Convention website.

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Articles of Interest

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Published on: June 17, 2016

Articles of Interest

Effects of label-dose permethrin administration in yearling beef cattle: I. Reproductive function and embryo quality of superovulated heifers

Effects of label-dose permethrin administration in yearling beef cattle: I. Bull reproductive function and testicular histopathology

The 9-day CIDR-PG protocol: Incorporation of PGF2α pretreatment into a long-term progestin-based estrus synchronization protocol for postpartum beef cows

N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA during IVM affected oocyte developmental competence in cattle

Use of bovine pregnancy-associated glycoproteins to predict late embryonic mortality in postpartum Nelore beef cows

Effects of rumen-protected methionine and choline supplementation on the preimplantation embryo in Holstein cows

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