Save the date for the 2019 AETA-CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Convention!

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Published on: July 26, 2019

The 2019 AETA-CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Convention will be held from October 24–26, 2019, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The conference will take place at the Cheyenne Mountain Resort.

All of the AETA scientific, social and exhibitor information can be found on the AETA Annual Convention page as it becomes available. Check back often!

Colorado Springs is a wonderful city to hold this convention. Below you will find some links to help you plan your stay.

Garden of the Gods
Pikes Peak Region
Olympic Training Center
Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

This is a very small list of the many attractions that Colorado Springs has to offer. Please check out Visit Colorado Springs to customize your stay.

We look forward to seeing you all in beautiful Colorado in October!

Sincerely,

AETA

Save the date for the 2019 AETA-CETA/ACTE Annual Meeting!

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Published on: April 17, 2019

The 2019 AETA-CETA/ACTE will be held from October 24–26, 2019, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The conference will be held at the Cheyenne Mountain Resort.

All of the AETA scientific, social, and exhibitor information can be found on the AETA Annual Convention page as it becomes available. Check back often!

Colorado Springs is a wonderful city to hold this convention. Below you will find some links to help you plan your stay.

Garden of the Gods
Pikes Peak Region
Olympic Training Center
Cheyenne Mountain Zoo
Manitou Springs

This is a very small list of the many attractions that Colorado Springs has to offer. Please check out Visit Colorado Springs to customize your stay.

We look forward to seeing you all in beautiful Colorado in October!

Sincerely,

AETA

December 2018 President’s Letter

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Published on: December 27, 2018

Happy Holidays!

To begin with, I would like to thank Matt Iager and CETA for putting on an excellent meeting in Montreal this year. I also thank all of you who filled out surveys after the conference. Your feedback provides the information we need to continue to improve our meetings. Congratulations to Dr. Pat Comyn and Dr. Clay Breiner as our newly elected board members. One of the highlights of the meeting for me was the opportunity to present the President’s Award to Dr. Richard Whitaker. Recognizing him for all he has done for this organization was such an honor. We wish him well in his retirement.

This past year has been an extremely difficult one for the dairy industry and I am sure it has had some effect on our businesses. There have been many changes to this industry (genomics etc.) and there will certainly be more in the future. The only constant is change. This organization provides us with a network to navigate through these changes.

Thank you for the opportunity to serve these past four years as a member of the board. It has gone by quickly and has been rewarding. There have been challenges in the past and there will be in the future, but you have elected an excellent group of board members to lead us in the future. The winter board meeting in going to be held the first weekend in March. If anyone has topics they would like us to discuss, please do not hesitate to contact me or any of the board members.

I encourage all of you to be active in this organization. It is your organization. The interactions and experiences are invaluable. There are many opportunities to serve including being a board member, a committee chair, or committee member. This is the life blood of our organization.

Once again, thank you for allowing me to be your president in 2018.

John Prososki
AETA President

December 2018 President-Elect Letter

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Published on: December 27, 2018

Greetings to everyone during this joyous holiday season and let us be reminded of what is most important in each of our lives. Let us continue to pray for the hard-working farmers and ranchers that allow us the opportunity to serve them. May the farming economy strengthen in the upcoming year.

Our Joint Annual Convention with CETA in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, was a great success and we thank the many volunteers who planned this convention and all of you for attending. Plans are underway for a terrific convention in beautiful Colorado Springs, Colorado, next fall.

Our industry continues to strengthen as we work together and share ideas that add opportunity, value, and success to our embryo transfer businesses. We thank the many individuals that continue to serve AETA and promote our organization. Remember to “LIKE” us on Facebook. Our board of directors, committee chairs and members, and FASS headquarters continue to create effective and efficient tools for success. We invite all of you to participate and serve in some capacity. Please reach out and let us know what interests you have to serve AETA. It’s great to see our vibrant youth at our conventions, and giving back to our organization is the best way to continue its legacy.

We would like to thank Dr. John Prososki for his outstanding leadership as president in 2018. John’s work ethic, energy, and passion inspire all of us in our daily work environments.

AETA looks forward to an outstanding year in 2019. If you have any questions, comments, or concerns please feel free to contact me or any member of the board as we work for you and strive to lead this organization professionally and with the goals, desires, and objectives of our membership.

I would like to thank all of you for the opportunity to serve as your next president for 2019 and look forward to working closely with you.

Sincerely,
Matthew E. Iager, DVM
AETA President-Elect

New Directors Elected to the AETA Board of Directors

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Published on: December 27, 2018

At the 2018 AETA & CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Convention, two new directors were elected to the AETA Board of Directors. Their terms will start on January 1, 2019. Clay Breiner, DVM, and Pat Comyn, DVM, are the two new representatives:

Clay Breiner, DVM, was raised on an eastern Kansas cow/calf ranch that markets Hereford and Angus genetics. He received his BS in animal science (1998) and DVM (2002) from Kansas State University.

Upon graduation, he joined Cross Country Genetics as a team veterinarian and has had the privilege of working there with Dr. Kirk Gray for the past 16 years. He has been AETA certified since 2003 and is currently serving on the AETA Certification Committee.

He is married to Kendra Rock, DVM DACT, who is also actively involved in the animal reproduction industry. They have two children, Kennan (7) and Beau (3).

Dr. Breiner’s professional interests include embryo transfer, the use of ultrasound as a predictor of fertility, and ways to manipulate the gender ratio. In his spare time, he enjoys spending time with his family at sporting events or exploring the countryside. He feels the challenge for the future is to make sure that our industry and profession stays relevant to the beef industry.

Pat Comyn, DVM. NCSU-CVM 1988. Owner of Virginia Herd Health Management Service P.C. located in Madison, Virginia. Certified AETA 2005, EU certified, owner breeder of registered Holsteins. I do general food animal medicine/surgery, ET, and OPU – IVF.

I’ve been married to my wife Barbara for 31 years. She is a small animal veterinarian. I have one kid in college (Virginia Tech), and the other kid is a research technician with Zoetis (poultry). I like to follow bird dogs in my spare time.

Join us in Colorado Springs in 2019!

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Published on: December 27, 2018

2018 AETA Statistics Committee Report

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Published on: December 27, 2018

Survey data is only as good as the quality and integrity of the data submitted by people. Thank you for taking the time to submit your data.
Unfortunately, I will not be able to attend this year’s meeting due to the birth of our precious Alice in the end of May. If you have any questions and/or suggestions for next year’s survey please contact me at any time. Special thanks to Michael Wehrman for his guidance.

Sincerely,
Daniela Demetrio, DVM, MS – ddembryos@gmail.com

2018 SURVEY SUMMARY (2017 DATA)

The submitted data from 238 embryo practitioners, 138 ETBs (Embryo Transfer Businesses), 119 AETA certified, is summarized below. This year, non-AETA members were allowed to submit data. Part of the increase in the numbers from last year is a consequence of that.

  • Embryo transfer work is the main business of 68 ETBs (considered >80% ET work);
  • 137 ETBs transferred embryos (20 only in vivo, 5 only in vitro, and 112 both);
  • 126 ETBs flushed cows;
  • 32 ETBs performed OPUs;
  • 13 IVF laboratories reported data (fertilized oocytes and cultured the embryos in vitro);
  • 16 ETBs produced other species embryos;

(more…)

AETA 2018 Scholarship Winner Report: Nate Baribault

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Published on: December 27, 2018

I was able to have another great experience at the CETA/ACTE and AETA annual meeting. I attended the annual conference a few years ago when it was hosted in Madison, Wisconsin. Like the Wisconsin conference, Montreal was an excellent location. The food was fantastic, the presentations shared a wealth of information that I was not familiar with, and I was able to socialize with other students and practitioners that had similar interests.

Before heading to the conference, I went through the program and thought that the presentations discussing nutrition and oocyte quality, the use of sexed semen, and the incorporation of in vitro fertilization (IVF), both in house and mobile, into practice would be the most interesting personally. Each of these presentations had some take-home points that I can utilize in the future.

With regard to oocyte quality and nutrition, it appears that vitamin A, D, and folic acid/B12 play an important role in production of quality oocytes and additional supplementation to donors may provide a benefit in both in vivo and in vitro embryo production. The presentation also mentioned that overconditioned females add lipid to the follicular fluid and this can affect mitochondrial function and oocyte quality. I have seen overconditioned donors struggle to produce oocytes and embryos, and was interested to see a reason behind it.

The discussions on the use of sexed semen in cattle also yielded practical advice. I was unaware that sexed semen was precapacitated and that breeding later in estrus would yield significantly better results. As a general rule of thumb, breed females 18 to 24 hours after estrus begins, or roughly 6 to 12 hours later than when you would breed with conventional semen. When utilizing sexed semen on donors, breeding later also showed a significant increase in fertilized embryos by breeding donors multiple times from 18 to 36 hours after the start of estrus. With the gain in popularity of bovine sexed semen, I believe there is a demand in other species, such as deer and small ruminants, and would be interested in seeing this technology utilized in these smaller industries.

Last, incorporating IVF into a traditional practice and the mobile ovum pick up (OPU) lab presentations provided ideas to increase business and a basis on setting up an OPU lab. Over the past couple of years, IVF has become more and more popular due to a few benefits over conventional embryo production. With this gain in popularity, adding OPU services is a necessity to stay relevant within the industry.

I enjoyed my time in Montreal, was able to make connections with practitioners and other students, and became more familiar with where the assisted reproductive technology industry is headed. I am planning to attend the 2019 conference in Colorado Springs next fall as a new graduate.

AETA 2018 Scholarship Winner Report: Michael Dupor

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Published on: December 27, 2018

I would like to begin by expressing my gratitude to the AETA membership for selecting me for this scholarship to attend the 2018 AETA Convention. It was an honor to be chosen to gain a better understanding of the world’s leading bovine reproductive organization.

My interest in advanced reproductive technologies comes from my desire to help advance sustainable food production. Our profession plays a critical role of helping to disseminate the finest genetics, making our beef and dairy animals more productive, and helping to reduce their environmental impact. I have been privileged to work with and shadow several veterinarians who provide these reproductive services.

It was incredible to attend the sessions and learn about the latest breakthroughs and hot topics within the industry. In veterinary school, we have very little training in this field or exposure to these topics. Even more valuable, in my mind, was the opportunity to meet and network with veterinarians and veterinary students from across the country. My favorite part of the conference was the student/mentor lunch, where we were able to have small group discussions with leading professionals in the field. It was a great chance to get advice on how to gain experience, tips about how to build a practice, and ideas about how to make the most of our clinical year.

Again, thank you to the AETA and the student scholarship selection committee for the chance to participate in this wonderful convention. Hope to see you all in 2019!

AETA 2018 Scholarship Winner Report: Ben Eilerts

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Published on: December 27, 2018

I would like to begin by thanking the AETA, the members, and especially the scholarship committee for granting me the scholarship and financial support to attend the 2018 CETA/ACTE and AETA joint convention in Montreal, Canada, and providing me the opportunity to network and socialize with the men and women that have made this industry what it is today. This truly was an amazing opportunity and experience for me now as a student and in my future as a veterinarian. My intent was to leave the CETA/ACTE and AETA joint convention with a more comprehensive knowledge base on the research and practical application of assisted reproductive technologies in cattle and to get an idea on where the industry is headed and the steps that are being taken to advance the industry.

The preconference seminar that John Hasler and Reuben Mapletoft gave was a very interesting and informative talk to begin the conference because it showed all the research that backed up why the protocols and operating procedures of embryo transfer (ET) are set up the way they are. When learning about advanced reproductive technologies in school and in private practice, I got an idea of what goes into ET, so listening to all the studies and data behind everything put things into perspective and gave me a good knowledge base on setting up for success as I get ready to become a veterinarian and go into the field working with advanced reproductive technologies.

Another part of the convention I really enjoyed was the student luncheon where we got to talk with AETA members from different parts of the country. It gave students a chance to talk with and learn from knowledgeable practitioners in the field and what to expect when becoming a part of the ET and IVF industry. It was really beneficial to learn about the industry when they started as practitioners and where they believe it is headed in the future as we get ready to join the industry.

There were a lot of really interesting presentations and research presented at this year’s joint convention. I gained way more knowledge than I expected and got a real appreciation of all the hard work men and women of the industry do to advance the industry and research new technologies. I enjoyed getting to socialize and network with AETA members and to learn from them and their experiences. It is my hope to take the knowledge gained from this year’s convention and to expand on it throughout my potential career in the industry. I would strongly recommend that any students who are thinking about attending the conference in the future do so because it is a tremendous experience and a great opportunity that you will not regret. Thank you again to everyone who not only made my trip possible, but also made it an invaluable experience.

AETA 2018 Scholarship Winner Report: Elizabeth Endres

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Published on: December 27, 2018

Although my departure to the CETA/ACTE and AETA Joint Convention was slightly delayed due to a “small bird” located in one of our plane’s engines, I eventually arrived in beautiful Montreal after a long day of studying in various airports. I couldn’t help but feel that I missed out on informative pre-conference lectures on mycotoxins and oocyte quality, and the chance to try a Canadian classic, poutine, at the preconference social. Despite my late arrival, I feel that I made up for lost time the following days at the conference.

I loved the fact that a variety of topics were presented at each of the sessions. Some were very specific and practical for embryo transfer (ET) practice, while others presented more general reproductive physiology concepts. I really enjoyed the session on oviductal and early uterine effects on pregnancy success and think ideas I learned from that lecture can be applied to general bovine practice as well as ET. However, my favorite session of the conference was the session on breed differences in embryo freezing capacity. I had heard in the past from my mentoring veterinarian that Jersey embryos “don’t freeze as well,” but this talk had scientific data to support this and showed possible reasons as to why there is a difference.

The breaks between sessions and the Friday night banquet was when we got the chance to meet and network with ET practitioners from around the country. I also enjoyed the student mentor lunch, where we had the opportunity to ask practitioners about their experiences, how they got their start in advanced reproduction, and any advice that they had for new graduates. The group of student scholarship recipients quickly got to know each other, and I look forward to reconnecting at future AETA meetings. I felt so welcomed by the close-knit community of ET practitioners and see myself attending in the future to reconnect with colleagues and meet the next crop of aspiring ET practitioners.

I would like to sincerely thank the AETA, members of the scholarship selection committee, and the entire AETA membership for supporting students financially, but also for welcoming us to the conference. This is truly an invaluable experience for students to leave the classroom and gain knowledge applicable to their future as bovine veterinarians, network with future colleagues in the industry, and learn about all the benefits of being an AETA member.

AETA 2018 Scholarship Winner Report: Kaitlyn Farmer

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Published on: December 27, 2018

Expectations can be dangerous to set because of the possibility of disappointment to follow. Despite the rather high expectations I set for the 2018 AETA, they were easily met and often exceeded. I anticipated learning about new technology and current techniques within the embryo transfer industry and meeting new people to look up to and learn from; however, I was most excited by the kindness, comradery, and energy to educate those of us just getting started. Each introduction led to encouragement to become involved and genuine interest in who I am. Learning bovine embryo transfer and getting started in this field will have plenty of challenges, but it is comforting to now know the kind of people and their incredible expertise I have access to along the way. Thank you for generously providing student scholarships to make our attendance possible, for making us feel welcome, and for taking the time to share your experiences.

The preconference seminar I attended quickly set the tone for the rest of the weekend, allowing me to focus on just embryo transfer for a few days. I appreciated that many topics throughout the conference had a practical component that could be applied to advanced reproductive technology practices: how to feed donors, when to use artificial insemination when using sexed semen, and clues to donor and recipient reproductive health. I am returning to school excited to continue to learn about embryo transfer. Thank you for this wonderful opportunity!

AETA 2018 Scholarship Winner Report: Cameron Menard

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Published on: December 27, 2018

This past September I had the opportunity to participate in the annual AETA/CETA meeting as a student scholar. I came to the meeting this year as a fourth year veterinary student in hopes of learning more about the profession and the organization. The things that stood out on my trip were the informative lectures and the incredible people that make up the AETA and CETA. I feel fortunate to have had the opportunity to spend time connecting with the many veterinarians and embryologists who were present at the meeting. One of the positives that I took away from the meeting was seeing that other youthful individuals like myself seem to be getting involved. The AETA has focused on gaining membership in younger demographics, and it is encouraging to see others that are so interested in joining and contributing to the embryo transfer community.

Of all of the lectures that I attended, I particularly enjoyed Claude Robert’s presentation on breed-associated embryo freezing capacity. The visuals that he provided regarding the channels present in the zona pellucida and their subsequent implications in fatty acid transport and metabolism helped me to get a better understanding of why Jersey embryos are inherently more difficult to freeze and attain successful pregnancy. The additional insight that follicular fluid has a great impact in mitochondrial development in the oocyte leads one to believe that it may be playing a role in dictating how efficiently lipids will be metabolized. Because a large portion of the members that make up the AETA/CETA are private practitioners, I also appreciated the information that was tailored toward applications in everyday practice for businesses dedicated to embryo transfer. While research helps us continue to push our knowledge about the various aspects of embryo transfer, I believe it is important to keep in mind what is practical and applicable for everyday practitioners.

As the meeting concluded late Saturday, it made me excited for the future of the AETA/CETA, as well as embryo transfer as a whole. I am incredibly thankful to the AETA organization for providing a scholarship opportunity that afforded me the ability to come to the meeting.  I look forward to keeping in touch with the individuals that I met at this year’s meeting, and I plan on attending the 2019 AETA/CETA Meeting in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

AETA 2018 Scholarship Winner Report: Rachel O’Leary

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Published on: December 27, 2018

I want to take the time to first thank the AETA Scholarship committee for choosing me, along with nine other well-deserving students, to attend the 2018 AETA-CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Convention in Montreal. I am honored to have had the opportunity to attend the convention and learn from experts across the nation and throughout the world. At the meeting, I met many practitioners and gained mentorship through them. I also became friends with fellow scholarship winners and am glad to call them colleagues whom I can call upon in the future.

My objective for attending the joint annual convention was to learn more about the advanced reproduction industry and the challenges it faces so that I could be more prepared once I graduate and go into the working field. My time in Montreal started with the Preconference Seminar II. At this preconference seminar, I gained invaluable information about the effects of nutrition on oocyte quality, mycotoxins on cow performance, and sexed semen fertility. I appreciated the amount of information we were given, and especially liked how it is still applicable to clients I may have that will not be utilizing embryo transfer, in vitro fertilization, or any advanced reproductive techniques.

Throughout the rest of my time at the convention I attended the various general and student/technician sessions. I gained information regarding damage prevention of frozen embryos, sanitary considerations, starting collection laboratories, incorporating in vitro fertilization, and much more. Attending the meeting opened my eyes to the many different techniques and niches each practice has and utilizes to best fit them and their clients. It also showed me the multitude of resources available for me, my fellow students, and my colleagues to ensure our success, and our clients’, within the industry. In addition to attending the sessions, I walked around the exhibit hall and communicated with industry professionals. By doing this, I networked for future externships, saw the newest equipment, and learned more about our current technology.

Overall, I am beyond grateful to have had the opportunity to attend the 2018 AETA-CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Convention in Montreal. I can safely say I walked away from this convention with more confidence about the work done within the embryo transfer profession and a fueled excitement for the future of it. The mentorship I gained and people I met will be something I remember throughout the rest of my career. I look forward to future meetings of AETA and hope that I can be as much help to students one day as the practitioners I met were to me at this meeting.

AETA 2018 Scholarship Winner Report: Paul Riedel

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Published on: December 27, 2018

Attending the 2018 AETA Convention was a great experience and I am very grateful for the opportunity to have gone. Having little instruction on embryo transfer (ET) in veterinary school and minimal field experience, it was extremely helpful to hear the ET101 seminar with John Hasler and Rueben Mapletoft. This was a great way to kick off the convention because it summarized points I already knew and introduced new concepts that would come up again. One of the topics I found interesting was the various ways to you can time follicular waves to initiate follicle-stimulating hormone superovulation. I had only been aware of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-based Presynch protocols and did not know about using follicle ablation or estradiol for this purpose. It was particularly interesting to hear about estradiol because it is not available in the United States. This international aspect of the convention was intriguing and introduced me to ET techniques used in places like Brazil. I didn’t know that heat stress has much less of an effect on ET than artificial insemination success, making ET more viable in Brazil. The Brazilian embryo collection technique of reflushing cows was also a new concept to me and gave me something to think about. At one point, John Hasler suggested that washing out a recipient’s uterus before introducing embryos can help prevent infertility caused by subclinical endometritis. I thought of this later during Mario Binelli’s seminar on the effect of uterine environment on fertility. I asked him how long it would take the uterus to return to its most fertile state after washing. The ET101 seminar did a great job of prompting these types of questions during the rest of the convention.

Many of the other seminars throughout the convention were a great benefit my education and sparked my curiosity. I thought the student/technician seminars were a great overview of the more technical side of ET. They provided some new ideas for things I would like to try in my future practice. For instance, Angelika Stock suggested pouring liquid nitrogen into a large Styrofoam lid and dropping the embryo/semen straws in there for easy viewing and sorting between tanks. Jonathan Lehouiller’s talk on his mobile ovum pick up lab also gave me some interesting ideas for potential projects of my own.

The student/mentor lunch was a fantastic place for me to spend some time with a small group of seasoned practitioners and recent grads. I picked their brain for advice, made new connections, and found out just how small this ET community is. I found they personally knew or were familiar with many of the same people I have worked with. It was good to place to get a lay of the land between DVM private practitioners, PhD embryologists, and corporate partners.

The numerous meals and social events included with my registration were also good places to network with my future colleagues. The more I got to know these folks, the more comfortable I felt asking them questions and learning from them. I really appreciate how welcoming everyone was at the convention and it was obvious how much effort was put into making students part of the community.

AETA 2018 Scholarship Winner Report: Travis Roberts

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Published on: December 27, 2018

I learned and took away the following from the 2018 AETA convention. First, it was a pleasure and I really enjoyed this opportunity that AETA gave me. I met a lot of people who were willing to share their story and how they got started with embryo transfer (ET) work. Hearing all these stories has given me a better idea of how I can start to incorporate and change my plans to start adding ET services at the clinic I am working at. The student/technician sessions were very helpful in the point that they went over the basics and reminded me of steps and precautions that I need to take before transferring embryos and flushing. I also got to meet several vendors and set up accounts to start purchasing supplies to get started. I spent some time visiting with ultrasound representatives and got information and hopefully will set up sometimes for demonstrations, so my clinic can purchase a mobile unit.

The plans at my current clinic are to start transferring frozen embryos for clients. After we get started with this and have our new large animal facility built, I would like to start flushing and transferring fresh embryos and performing OPU’s to send to Trans Ova for the in vitro fertilization work. However, I do plan on going out on my own and purchasing a mixed animal practice with my wife at some point. When we do this, I will be able to switch gears and solely practice large animal medicine. I do not know if I will ever solely do ET work, but I would like to offer the service to my clients. I am also considering taking the certification in a few years, if I get enough business.

Once again thank you for this great opportunity and I look forward to future conventions.

AETA 2018 Scholarship Winner Report: Eric Zwiefelhofer

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Published on: December 27, 2018

I would like to thank the AETA for allowing me to attend the AETA/CETA Annual Conference in Montreal this year. I have wanted to attend the meeting since being introduced to the embryo transfer (ET) world while working with AETA accredited ET veterinarians in Wisconsin. Following my completion of my BS in dairy science from the University of Wisconsin–River Falls, I ventured north to the University of Saskatchewan in Canada to pursue my PhD in the area of cattle reproduction, specifically working with fixed-time artificial insemination protocols utilizing a nonsteroidal approach. Following the completion of my program, I plan to move back to Wisconsin and work in the ET industry as an AETA certified practitioner.

I come from a graduate student background where conferences can sometimes be overly scientific, and I sometimes find myself asking what the real-world take away is. When the pre-conference session began, I knew that this was real-world, practical knowledge that could be applied to the field of embryo transfer. Although all of the topics were very informative, the talk that made me think the most was the talk by David Kenny. His research revolved around nutrition in pre-pubertal bulls, but it had implications on early puberty in heifers as well. Although oocytes can be collected from pre-pubertal heifers, oocyte competence is lower and therefore achieving puberty earlier may result in better oocyte quality and shorten the generation interval. He also brought up the interesting topic of epigenetics, which was a new topic to me.

As informative as the scientific sessions were, I benefitted most from networking with practitioners and students from across North America. I was impressed with the openness of all the practitioners and the responses of the many questions regarding the topics presented. I want to thank David Duxbury and Glenn Engelland for mentoring my table at the student/mentor lunch. The knowledge that I received in a short time went far beyond the ET industry. The banquet also allowed me to interact with students and form lifelong connections.

I want to sincerely thank the AETA for allowing me to attend their annual conference and also to the board, sponsors, and members for making the meeting successful. The knowledge and connections that I received in Montreal will be beneficial to myself when I begin a career in the ET industry. I am looking forward to next year’s meeting already. Thank you again.

New Directors Elected to the AETA Board of Directors

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Published on: December 27, 2017

At the 2017 AETA & CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Convention, two new directors were elected to the AETA Board of Directors. Their terms will start on January 1st, 2018. William Croushore, DVM, and Jeremy VanBoening, DVM, are the two new representatives:

Dr. Bill Croushore attended veterinary school at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine (Virginia Tech), graduating in 1997.  Prior to veterinary school, Dr. Croushore attended Duquesne University School of Pharmacy and graduated in 1992.  He practiced pharmacy in southwest Virginia until he was accepted into veterinary school in 1993.  Dr. Croushore was raised in Ruffsdale, Westmoreland County in southwest Pennsylvania.
Dr. Croushore’s professional interests include embryo transfer, pushing the limits of on farm OPU, herd health management and bovine surgery.  Dr. Croushore has been AETA Certified since 2012.  He has been an accredited OPU partner for Boviteq since 2014.

Dr. Croushore holds membership in the following professional organizations:  American Veterinary Medical Association, Pennsylvania Veterinary Medical Association, American Association of Bovine Practitioners, Society for Theriogenology, American Embryo Transfer Association and the International Embryo Transfer Society. In addition, Dr. Croushore is the treasurer for the Somerset County Holstein Association and is a member of the Berlin-Brothersvalley School District Ag Advisory Committee.

Dr. Croushore writes a weekly column in the Somerset Daily American entitled “The View from the Back 40” and a monthly column in Farm, Field and Garden.  He is also a regular contributor to Pinzgauer Journal and also the Keystone Cattleman.

He enjoys time with his family, hunting the often elusive whitetail deer, fishing and home brewing beer.  Dr. Croushore is married to his wife of 22 years, Sheila and the proud father of Nolan and Bena.  He attends St. Peter’s Roman Catholic Church where he teaches 8th grade CCD class.

 

Jeremy VanBoening received his BS degree from University of Nebraska-Lincoln in Animal Science in 1998 and his DVM from Kansas State University in 2002. He practiced in South Dakota one year before purchasing a 2 doctor practice in Alma, NE in 2003.  The practice has grown and changed over the years and currently has 5 doctors and 12 support staff. In 2010 Republican Valley Genetics was founded to provide ET services for the clinic and is the focus of Dr. VanBoening today. RVG provides in house and on farm ET services as well as serves as a satellite center for IVF services with Trans Ova Genetics.

Jeremy has served on several professional boards and committees including the Nebraska Cattlemen, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, American Association of Bovine Practitioners, and Nebraska Veterinary Medical Association.  These associations have allowed him experience with domestic and international trade, policy making both at the state and federal level, sustainability in the beef industry and bovine veterinarian practice, as well as the opportunity for contacts throughout the industry.  Professional memberships include AETA, IETS, AABP, AVC, AVMA, and NVMA.

Jeremy and his wife Erin have one son William who is 10 years old.  In addition to the RVAC and RVG they run 400 beef cows comprised of a commercial cow-calf and a growing recipient herd.  He feels it would be an honor to serve the organization that gave him the knowledge and confidence to begin and grow the embryo transfer business.

 

Articles of Interest

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Published on: December 27, 2017

Comparison of pregnancy outcomes using either an Ovsynch or a Cosynch protocol for the first timed AI with liquid or frozen semen in lactating dairy cows

 

Holding immature bovine oocytes in a commercial embryo holding medium: High developmental competence for up to 10 h at room temperature

 

Flunixin meglumine improves pregnancy rate in embryo recipient beef cows with an excitable temperament

 

Reproductive performance of lactating dairy cows after inducing ovulation using hCG in a five-day progesterone-based fixed-time AI protocol

 

Lupeol supplementation improves the developmental competence of bovine embryos in vitro

 

Effect of initial GnRH and time of insemination on reproductive performance in cyclic and acyclic beef heifers subjected to a 5-d Co-synch plus progesterone protocol

(more…)

AETA 2017 Scholarship Winner Report: Michael Campbell

Categories: Annual Meeting
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Published on: December 27, 2017

I would like to start by expressing my gratitude for the honor of being selected as a scholarship recipient. I graduated with my BS in animal science in 2015 thinking that was all the schooling I would do. I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to work with an AETA-certified veterinarian flushing cattle and developed a strong passion for reproduction. This led to the decision to return to school to pursue a MS in reproductive physiology and hopefully go to vet school following completion. I am currently in my first semester of my MS and am working full time at an assisted reproduction facility in Stillwater, Oklahoma. I applied for the scholarship in hopes that I would be able to listen to experts in their respective fields discuss current research and findings. However, what I experienced was much more. Although the science sessions were very interesting and informative, the most influential aspect of the conference was the networking available. I met and spoke with many practitioners that were very kind and willing to spend time speaking with me and offering advice for my future endeavors. By far, my favorite part of the conference was the student mentor lunch session. Being able to sit down with professionals who were recently in our shoes was invaluable. I am extremely grateful to Dr. Prososki, Dr. Schmitt, and Dr. Swenson for spending the amount of time they did with us at the mentor lunch. The advice I received in that hour and a half was more significant than I could have ever imagined. The experiences and discussions I had at the conference have already had an effect on my academics, steering my master’s research in the direction of cryopreservation and complications during the freezing process, specifically the point at which embryos can be plunged and still maintain viability in the event of freezer failure. I would again like to express my gratitude to AETA and all the practitioners who were willing to speak with me throughout the conference for making me feel welcome and offering genuine advice to me and my fellow scholarship recipients.

Thank you,

Michael Campbell
Oklahoma State University

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