2019 AETA Candidates for the Board of Directors

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Published on: October 11, 2019
Larry Lanzon, DVM

Born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, Larry Lanzon graduated from Michigan State University School of Veterinary Medicine in 1980. He has spent 39 years in private practice, the last 3 years with Embryo Inc. Lanzon joined the AETA in 1982 and was privileged to have Edwin Robertson, Bob Rowe, Reuben Mapletoft, and Joe Wright as his mentors when getting started in assisted reproductive technology. Lanzon earned a masters of preventative veterinary medicine in epidemiology in 2013 from UC Davis.

Lanzon and his wife Cathy raised three children—Jesse, Casey, and Caitlin—together in Turlock, which is absolutely his proudest accomplishment. Presently, there are three grandsons—Casey, Cody, and Charlie—in the Lanzon clan.

Through the years, Lanzon spent his time with the Boy Scouts of America; attending swim meets, water polo games, and gymnastic meets; raising Red Angus cattle; and fly-fishing with his children.

In practice, Lanzon enjoyed the diversity of dairy practice, working with and teaching students from all over the world. However, he quickly developed an interest in assisted reproductive technology and has continued to learn, teach, and enjoy embryo transfer and IVF. He respectfully thanks all those who helped him along the way.

Brad Lindsey, PhD

In 1984, Brad Lindsey helped start and manage the former Granada Corporation’s equine services division. In 1988, he transferred to their bovine embryo transfer division and managed their main production lab and was involved in commercializing IVF services. In 1992, he was hired by Trans Ova Genetics in Sioux Center, Iowa, to start their IVF service division. In 1994, Lindsey began his PhD with Jim Kinder at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. His research focus was endocrine regulation of reproductive hormones in beef cattle. In 1997, he went to Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia, to pursue postdoctoral research at the former Tropical Beef Centre with Michael D’Occhio.

In 1998, he was hired as general manager of Stroud Veterinary Embryo Services in Weatherford, Texas, under the direction of Brad Stroud. Between 2000 and 2005, Lindsey worked for AB Technology (now ABT360), Minitube of America, and Genetic Resources Int’l (now Sexing Technologies) in various technical roles, directing research and product development and developing an IVF lab service platform. In 2005, he started Rex Consulting, providing ET services and technical support to cattle producers, biotech companies, and other ET firms, and in 2008 incorporated as Ovitra Biotechnology Inc. Ovitra continues to provides commercial and contract ET services, technical support, consulting, and training to beef and dairy producers, research universities, and other ET firms.

Dr. Lindsey is currently an active member, serving on several committees within AETA (Certification and Research), IETS (HASAC, Manuals and Forms), and the Texas Southwest Cattle Raisers Association (Research and Education). He and his wife, Mary, live in Midway, Texas, and are active in their church and community. They have two grown children, Grace Richardson and Payton Lindsey.

Greg Schueller, DVM

Greg Schueller grew up on a dairy farm in southwest Wisconsin, where he developed his interest in and passion for dairy cattle and veterinary medicine. He received his DVM from the University of Wisconsin in 1991.

Upon graduation, he joined a mixed-animal practice in southwest Wisconsin, where he focused on dairy reproduction and herd health from 1991 to 2009. He added embryo transfer services to the practice in 1998 and joined the AETA at that time. In 2006, he became AETA certified and continued to grow the ET side of the practice until he joined Sunshine Genetics, an embryo transfer exclusive practice, in 2009. Currently, he is an owner of Sunshine Genetics with his business partner Aaron Prososki.

His wife Marcia is a speech therapist in the Fort Atkinson school district. They have three wonderful daughters, Brianna (20), Kailyn (18), and Melia (15). In his spare time, he enjoys traveling with his wife and family and is beginning to look forward to the next phase of life as his children are reaching adulthood and gaining independence.

Cary Schroeder, DVM

Cary Schroeder is co-owner of Lena Veterinary Clinic, an L0 doctor mixed-animal practice in Lena, lllinois. Schroeder received his BS in animal science in 1980 and DVM degree in 1984 from lowa State University. He has been a member of AETA since 2000 and certified in embryo transfer since 2003. He is currently serving on the AETA audit committee.

He and his wife Sarah, their children John (Abby), Christin (Dana Keefer), and Casey (Brianna), and their six grandchildren all live in or near Lena, lllinois. They enjoy spending time with their family, boating, traveling, hunting, and golfing.

Reminder: Proposed By-Laws Changes to be Voted on at AETA Annual Business Meeting–October 25, 2019

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Published on: October 11, 2019

Dear AETA members:

The purpose of AETA is to unite those organizations and individuals in the United States engaged in the embryo transfer industry into an affiliated federation operating under self- imposed standards of performance and conduct. As AETA delivers on education and standards of quality through its certification program, we become the “voice” for our diverse membership.

Based on recommendations from the membership, the board has proposed the following modifications to the By-Laws relating to membership categories. The reasons for the changes are several. These changes will make official some membership categories that have been previously offered but not officially recognized in the By-Laws, such as Life Membership. It will also make official reduced membership fees to former student members for one year following graduation. The proposed changes will also move the Association in the direction of a professional association and away from a trade association. We feel this is important to continue to foster relationships with other professional veterinary and animal science organizations such as AABP, AASRP, and IETS. This transition will allow the Association to continue to fulfill its primary purpose of education and promoting a high standard of quality through certification. Finally, it will reduce some redundancy in the membership categories by combining Regular and Associate Membership into only Associate Membership.

• Professional: An individual who is actively engaged in the embryo transfer industry who is a licensed veterinarian in the US or holds a PhD in reproductive physiology from a US institution. Other equivalent degrees as approved by the Board of Directors. Professional Members are eligible to vote, serve on committees, and hold an office in the Association.

• Associate: Organizations or individuals engaged in a business or occupation related to the embryo transfer industry that do not meet the requirements for Professional, Emeritus, Life, or Student Memberships. These Associate Members may not vote but will otherwise be entitled to full privileges of membership and can attend meetings, serve on committees, and receive newsletters.

• Life: Board of Directors can confer, at its discretion, honorary Life Membership to a practitioner for exemplary service. Life Members may enjoy the rights of their previous Professional Membership status.

• Emeritus: Individuals who have been Professional Members of the Association for a period of at least 10 years and who deem themselves as retired from activities associated with Professional Membership. Emeritus Members may enjoy the rights of their previous Professional Membership status. Emeritus Membership is granted by an application, in writing, to the Board of Directors, who have the sole right to invoke or revoke the Emeritus status to a Professional Member.

• Student: Individuals enrolled in an academic program at the graduate level and pursuing either a veterinary degree or PhD in reproductive physiology. Academic status must be verified annually by an academic advisor or a Professional Member. Student Members are not eligible to vote or hold office in the Association. Following graduation, former Student Members are eligible to become Professional Members at half of the cost of the Professional Membership for one year only.

This change in membership classification simplifies our current method and makes it easily distinguishable with less redundancy.

This is to inform you of a By-Laws change that will be proposed at the 2019 annual convention in Colorado Springs, Colorado, October 24-26, 2019. We hope you understand and can identify with this proposal. Please reach out to board members with questions you may have.

Sincerely,
AETA Board of Directors

AETA_Bylaws_Proposed_Changes

Remember When? AETA Past Meeting History

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Published on: October 11, 2019

Fast Facts:

  • At the organizational meeting of the AETA, 29 August, 1981, in Denver :
    • First order of business was an agreement to thoroughly study the problem of existing ET patents and pending litigation against ET practitioners
  • 1981 AETA Annual Dues = $1.00 per embryo handled ($250 minimum and $5,000 maximum)
  • The first Board met the first time for one day in Sept. 1982 at the O’Hare Hilton
  • In addition, the AETA asked for and received donations for a legal fund

1983 – First Convention 

  • Location: Ft. Collins, Colorado
    • Hotel cost was $33/night
  • Dates: January 18-19, 1983 – following the IETS conference
  • There were 51 attendees
  • The program included:
    • Established 4 standing committees
    • Panel presentation on problems with export of embryos
    • Augspurger patent lawsuit review
  • Did you know? Bob Garey, Executive Vice President of the AETA was hit over the head in his motel room by an intruder who entered at night through a sliding door
1983 Proceedings Cover
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ICAR Announces Dr. Gabriel Bó as Recipient of 2020 Simmet Prize for Assisted Reproduction

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Published on: October 11, 2019

Sydney, Australia, October 3, 2019: The International Congress on Animal Reproduction (ICAR) announces that Dr. Gabriel Bó of the Instituto de Reproducción Animal Córdoba (IRAC) in Córdoba, Argentina is the recipient of the 2020 Simmet Prize for Assisted Reproduction. The prize, which is the most prestigious award in animal reproduction and one of the largest of its kind, was given for the pioneering efforts of Dr. Bó to develop practical protocols for fixed-time artificial insemination, superovulation and embryo transfer in cattle.

Dr. Bó is currently President and Director of Research and Post-graduate training at IRAC and Professor of Obstetrics and Biotechnology of Reproduction at the Veterinary School of the Instituto de Ciencias Basicas y Aplicadas, Universidad Nacional de Villa Maria in Cordoba, Argentina. IRAC is one of the few organizations of its kind with missions in research, teaching, and clinical service including embryo transfer, artificial insemination, and gamete and embryo cryopreservation. Over 1300 veterinarians in South and Central America have received education on animal reproduction since IRAC opened in 1995.

Bó and his colleagues have developed what are now the de facto standard protocols for superovulation in cattle. Research conducted by him and his collaborators on estrus synchronization and fixed-time artificial insemination has been one of the key drivers for implementation of these technologies by producers throughout South America and globally. Together, these practices are revolutionizing genetic selection and reproductive management of cattle.

The Simmet Prize is sponsored by Minitube International and administered by ICAR. The prize, established as a memorial to the accomplishments of Dr. Ludwig Simmet, a pioneer in development of artificial insemination in farm animals and founder of Minitube, recognizes an active research scientist for basic and applied research published during the previous six years in the area of assisted reproduction of animals. The prize is presented each 4 years and includes an award of 50,000 euros.

Articles of Interest

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Published on: October 11, 2019

https://phys.org/news/2018-03-bovine-embryos-early-human.html

https://www.animal-reproduction.org/current

https://epigeneticsandchromatin.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13072-017-0171-z

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28131573

PAID ADVERTISEMENT: OPU Training Programs at OvaGenix

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Published on: March 21, 2017

PAID ADVERTISEMENT: OPU Training Programs at OvaGenix

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Published on: December 9, 2016

AETA 2016 Scholarship Winner Report: Robert Stenger

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Published on: December 9, 2016

I grew up on a full-time livestock farm. The farm is predominantly cattle, and in the last 10 years or so my family has increased their sheep numbers. It is mostly a commercial operation, though my father has made strides to get some of the best genetics in the Katahdin sheep breed. All our breeding has always been done natural service with a selection emphasis on hardiness and minimal inputs—a so to speak, let the grass do the work type of system. I know a bit about raising livestock but very little about more modern reproductive techniques. Growing up with this livestock background, I see the great potential for embryo transfer (ET) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) to rapidly increase the selection process. No matter the trait for which one is selecting, being able to increase the number of offspring from your best animals will help you reach your goals all the more rapidly.

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AETA Certification Advertising

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Published on: June 17, 2016

The Education Committee continues to progress with their activities.  During the strategic planning session that was conducted in February 2013, one of the three focus areas was strengthening the AETA Certification program.  This includes increasing the visibility and value of AETA Certification through marketing the “brand” of Certification.  The Board delegated this marketing task to the Education Committee, and Matt Iager and his fellow committee members have been working with an ad designer to develop a simple, yet eye-catching message about AETA Certification, not just to producers, but also to practitioners.  Keep an eye out for these (shown below) advertisements in a major bovine publication near you!

AETA_March2016_Holstein

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History Shines New Light on Recipient Care

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Published on: June 17, 2016

History Shines New Light on Recipient Care

By Nate Dorshorst

Portions of this article were originally published in Holstein World 2013 and are reproduced here with their consent.

Recipient management is probably the most overlooked aspect of any embryo transfer program but can probably have the greatest impact on success with a modest financial investment. There is a new emerging science originating from the human realm, which is now becoming heavily investigated at universities throughout the country with significant application to bovine reproduction and genomics. To better understand how this applies to bovine advanced reproduction, it is helpful to understand the historical context leading to its discovery.

The Dutch famine of 1944, also known as the “Hunger Winter,” was a brief but severe famine near the end of World War II when the Germans occupied the Netherlands. In order to punish the Dutch for their reluctance to aid the Nazi war effort, the Germans placed a food embargo to the farming areas in the western region of the Netherlands. This embargo was partially lifted in early November 1944, but unfortunately an unusually early and especially harsh winter had already set in. The canals froze over and became impassable for barges, leaving the cities in the western Netherlands with a scarce food supply. Within a very short time period the food was gone and a population desperate to survive had their diet reduced to bread, potatoes, sugar beets, and tulip bulbs, receiving as little as 400 to 800 calories/day. From September 1944 until early 1945, malnutrition was the primary cause of death of 18,000 Dutch people, and it was considered a contributing factor in the deaths of many more. When the Dutch Famine ended with the liberation of the western Netherlands in May 1945, around 22,000 had died and 4.5 million were otherwise affected.

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AABP Edwin Robertson Beginning Embryo Transfer Seminar

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Published on: June 17, 2016

AABP Edwin Robertson Beginning Embryo Transfer Seminar

August 10–12, 2016

Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

The American Association of Bovine Practitioners (AABP), with support from the American Embryo Transfer Association, will hold a three-day embryo transfer seminar for beginners on August 10 to 12, 2016, at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine in Blacksburg, Virginia. If you want to learn embryo transfer or if you have begun and are struggling, this seminar is for you. You will be taught the most up-to-date techniques by a staff member with years of experience.

For complete details please visit the AABP website.

Save the Date: 2016 AETA and CETA/ACTE Joint Convention

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Published on: June 17, 2016

Save the Date

The 2016 Joint AETA and CETA/ACTE Convention Committee would like to remind you to save the date for the 2016 convention taking place in St. Louis, Missouri, on September 29 to October 1, 2016.

Details can be found on the 2016 AETA and CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Convention website.

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Be a Mentor!

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Published on: March 28, 2016

AETA takes great pride in its Student Scholarship award to help cover expenses to attend the AETA-CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Convention.

We would encourage practitioners to support the students by becoming a mentor or offering an externship. The AETA website offers visibility to those who are interested in providing this support to students.

Hosting a fourth-year veterinary student for an externship provides a great opportunity to recruit new members and teach new skills. In addition, serving as a mentor provides additional support from practitioners to encourage and support students.

Please take this time to visit the website and sign up. Thank you.

Sign up to be a mentor

Sign up to offer an externship

Reminder: AETA members have access to Tech Talk!

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Published on: March 28, 2016

Tech Talk

The CETA/ACTE Tech Talk Program is an interactive notepad used to post technical embryo transfer questions, results of clinical trials, or comments that are then distributed to the participants via e-mail. The program is for both CETA/ACTE and AETA members.

If you are an AETA member who would like access to Tech Talk, please e-mail the CETA/ACTE office at CETA.ACTE@gmail.com for more information!

2015 AETA Board Election Candidates

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Published on: September 23, 2015

BigalkKory Bigalk, DVM

Kory Bigalk was born and raised on a small beef farm in southeastern Minnesota. He graduated from the University of Minnesota, College of Veterinary Medicine, in 1998.

Bigalk practiced large animal medicine in a primarily dairy practice from 1998 until 2010. He began doing embryo transfer and ultrasound work in 2001. In 2010 he purchased an existing embryo transfer business, formed Diamond K Genetics, and began doing embryo transfer work full time.

Bigalk and his wife have three young children and live on a small hobby farm, where they raise purebred Simmental cattle.

 

DixonDave Dixon, DVM

Dave Dixon is a certified practitioner who grew up on a beef and swine farm in southern Indiana. He graduated from Purdue University in 1995 with a DVM degree. He practiced as an associate veterinarian with Food Animal Veterinary Service for 19 years. He is now a partner in a multi-doctor practice in Rensselaer, Indiana, that specializes in bovine and small ruminant embryo transfer.  In the past year they have begun offering IVF services in conjunction with Boviteq.

As a candidate for Board of Directors, he seeks to maintain the AETA as a professional organization that offers educational opportunities that cover the broad base of its current members. He promises to weigh each decision against the vision statement and by-laws that are already in place. A position on the board would provide him the opportunity to give back to the organization that has served him throughout his 20 years of practice.

Dave is a member of the AETA, IETS, and AABP.  He and his wife Lisa have 3 children, actively serve in their church, and enjoy raising and showing Hereford cattle.

 

IagerMatt Iager, DVM

Matt Iager, DVM, grew up in Fulton, Maryland, on a Registered Holstein dairy farm. He received his BS degree in dairy science in 1993 from the Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture. He received his DVM degree in 1996 from Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech.

Iager is a partner with Mid Maryland Dairy Veterinarians in Hagerstown, Maryland, after joining the practice upon graduation. He has performed embryo transfer for 20 years and was certified in 2001.

Iager served on the Alumni Board at the Veterinary School at Virginia Tech for 10 years. He is currently vice president of the Maryland Holstein Association, treasurer of the Maryland Dairy Shrine, and has served as a delegate for the last three years to the National Holstein Convention.

Iager has been married to his wife, Laura, for 17 years; they have a son, Noah, and a daughter, Brooke, who are both active in 4-H. Iager and his family own and operate MD-West-View Genetics where they house donors for clients and maintain a small recipient herd. Iager is active in his church and community, plays drums in the contemporary choir, and is a licensed auctioneer. He enjoys showing, judging, and flushing cattle.

Iager is currently chairman of the Education Committee for AETA and manages the material for the quarterly newsletter. He is very passionate about embryo transfer and welcomes the opportunity to serve on the AETA Board.

 

vanJeremy VanBoening, DVM

Jeremy VanBoening received his BS degree from University of Nebraska–Lincoln in animal science in 1998 and his DVM degree from Kansas State University in 2002. He practiced in South Dakota one year before purchasing a two-doctor practice in Alma, Nebraska, in 2003. The practice has grown to seven doctors and 23 support staff. In 2010, Republican Valley Genetics (RVG) was founded to provide the embryo transfer services for the clinic and is the focus of VanBoening today. Republican Valley Genetics provides in-house and on-farm embryo transfer services as well as serves as a satellite center for IVF services with Trans Ova Genetics.

Jeremy has served on several professional boards and committees including the Nebraska Cattlemen, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, American Association of Bovine Practitioners, and Nebraska Veterinary Medical Association. These associations have allowed him to gain experience with domestic and international trade, policymaking both at the state and federal level, sustainability in the beef industry and bovine veterinarian practice, as well as the opportunity for contacts throughout the industry. Professional memberships include AETA, IETS, AABP, AVC, AVMA, and NVMA.

Jeremy and his wife Erin have one son, William, who is eight years old. In addition to the RVAC and RVG, they run approximately 180 beef cows consisting of a commercial cow-calf and a recipient herd. VanBoening feels it would be an honor to serve the organization that gave him the knowledge and confidence to begin and grow the embryo transfer business.

Industry Update: Schmallenburg Virus and the EU

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Published on: September 23, 2015

As many of you know, germplasm exports from the European Union have been significantly affected by the emergence of Schmallenburg virus in Europe. Restrictions went into effect February 2012, and according to USDA APHIS, “The virus, thought to be distributed by flying insects such as midges and possibly mosquitos, is not known to be present in the U.S., and has not been reported to be of human health concern. Infection with the virus causes transient disease in adult cattle, sheep and goats, resulting in production losses; but has also been associated with a high percentage of fetal malformations, abortions, dystocias and death of infected pregnant animals. No treatments or vaccines are currently are available, and testing is currently limited in nature.”

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Genomics—A scientific yet practical approach

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Published on: September 23, 2015

by Dr. Pat Comyn

Let us imagine that we are embarking on a journey across the Atlantic ocean in a ship. We have two different ships that we will compare. One ship is the USS Pregen, and the other the USS Genomic. Both ships are identical in speed and power. However, the navigation systems are quite a bit different. The Pregen uses traditional, time-honored methods to navigate. Theoretically, if USS Pregen left New York harbor a thousand times for the Thames river mouth, it would find the west coast of Europe within 700 miles of the Thames 50% of the time and find the western coast of Europe and North Africa 90% of the time. The USS Genomic, also leaving New York harbor a thousand times for the Thames river mouth, can get within 50 miles of the mouth of the Thames river 70% of the time and within 100 miles 95% of the time because of the use of more modern navigational devices. Both ships are crossing the sea at the same speed, but one with more accurate (but not perfect) navigation.

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Time Management

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Published on: September 23, 2015

by Mid Maryland Dairy Vets

 “I simply do not have enough time…”

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.”  Aristotle

Too often, we make a beneficial recommendation and hear the response, “I do not have the time.” Therefore, make an attempt to read two books, The Toyota Way by Jeffrey K. Liker, a book about the Toyota business model that exemplifies “lean production,” and The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey. “But Toyota makes cars, not calves.” Just like Toyota, your embryo transfer work is a business. Toyota uses efficient business principles with an emphasis on product quality that can be easily applied to your business. Focus on eliminating “non-value-added” work and allow time for more “value-added” work. Prevent downtime by keeping equipment properly maintained: from vehicles to trailers, scopes to freezers, even printers and shipper tanks. Analyze every process/protocol to make changes that can save you time and energy. Actually writing protocols on paper will allow you to see where you are wasting time. Ask for feedback from your employees, in essence turning them into on-site quality-control inspectors. Take time to develop your employees which will increase their work efficiency. Develop standard operating procedures to decrease variability/provide consistency and to increase quality and performance, such as a template for exports to various countries. Improving management efficiency and quality will reduce costs and improve profitability.

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Robert Rowe Selected as One of the National Dairy Shrine Pioneers for 2015

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Published on: June 10, 2015

Robert Rowe, long-time AETA member and volunteer, has been selected as one of the 2015 National Dairy Shrine Pioneers.

For full detail on this honor, please read the article in Holsteinworld.

AETA Member Survey

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Published on: June 10, 2015

Thank you for taking time to read the quarterly newsletter from AETA!

This survey should take no longer than 5 minutes and consists of 27 brief questions.

One of our many goals is to keep each other informed through active communication, which enhances our association and its members.

We invite you to take this brief survey to help us evaluate a few areas we have been working on. Also, please take some time to visit the website now and in the future. There is something for everyone to enjoy!

Please click here to complete the survey now.

The deadline to submit this survey is August 1, 2015, by 11:59 p.m. CDT.

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