AETA President’s Report – Fall 2020

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Published on: November 2, 2020

Hello,

Our 2020 AETA CETA/ACTE conference was unconventional, but despite the challenges of delivering the conference virtually, it was a success. We had a total of 423 participants from 45 states and provinces as well as 16 foreign countries who registered for and participated in the virtual conference. Thank you to everyone who gave this a chance.

This endeavor would not have been possible without the logistical support of FASS. I would especially like to thank Morgan Montgomery, the AETA executive assistant. Also, thank you to Kevin Wolter with information technology, who helped us create the platform for content delivery and managed it during the conference.

As the AETA board began to wrap our minds around the dilemma that was COVID-19 as it pertains to the conference, one thing became very clear to me; we were going to be tested in uncharted waters. I feel fortunate that we had a strong group of board members who were devoted to the success of the 2020 conference. I especially thank Dr. Bill Croushore for the outstanding work that he and his committee did. The depth and breadth of the conference was excellent, and although the delivery of the content on a virtual platform presented challenges, it came through in extraordinary fashion.

After we concluded the virtual conference, it was a pleasure for me to present the Edwin Robertson Lifetime Achievement Award to Dr. Chris Keim and Dr. Dan Hornickel. They are certainly deserving of this honor, given the many contributions they have made to our profession. They say that they “care for the cows everyone cares about.” They have also cared for and guided the profession we all care about so deeply.

I also had the privilege to present Dr. Scott Armbrust with the 2020 President’s Award. He has been a vital part of developing, maintaining, and enhancing foreign markets for the AETA and our producers. He has also served the AETA on the Cooperator Committee as well as having served as an AETA president. It was an honor for me to present him with this very well-deserved award on behalf of AETA.

Unfortunately, there was one aspect of our annual conference that we had no way to replicate virtually. We all missed the opportunity to see friends and enjoy each other’s fellowship. For that reason and others, I suspect we will all relish the chance to get together in beautiful Vancouver to see one another next fall.

Sincerely, Matthew Dorshorst, MS, DVM

Thank you to the 2020 AETA-CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Convention Sponsors

Categories: Annual Meeting
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Published on: November 2, 2020

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The AETA Announces 2020 Award Winners and 2021 Board of Directors

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Published on: November 2, 2020

The 2020 Annual Meeting of the AETA was held October 6 and 7. More than 400 national and international attendees came together virtually to learn more about the most recent advances in advanced bovine reproductive procedures and technology.

Listed below are the winners of the 2020 AETA awards who were recognized at the meeting and the incoming 2021 AETA board of directors.

The Edwin Robertson Lifetime Achievement Award

Dr. Chris Keim – Whitewater, WI

Dr. Dan Hornickel – Whitewater, WI

AETA President’s Award

Dr. Scott Armbrust – Green Bay, WI

The 2021 Board of Directors

President – Dr. William Croushore, Berlin, PA

Vice President – Dr. Clay Breiner, Westmoreland, KS

Secretary-Treasurer – Dr. Greg Schueller, Whitewater, WI

Immediate Past President – Dr. Matthew Dorshorst, Marshfield, WI

Director – Dr. Jeremy VanBoening, Alma, NE

Director – Dr. Pat Comyn, Madison, VA

Director – Dr. Brad Lindsey, Midway, TX

Director – Dr. Daniela Demetrio, Riverdale, CA

Director – Dr. Charles Gue, Belgrade, MT

2021 AETA-CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Convention

In addition, the AETA announces its 2021 joint annual convention with the Canadian Embryo Transfer Association (CETA), to be held in the fall of 2021 in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Dr. Chris Keim accepts The Edwin Robertson Lifetime Achievement Award
Dr. Dan Hornickel accepts The Edwin Robertson Lifetime Achievement Award
Dr. Scott Armbrust accepts the AETA President’s Award

The AETA Certification Requirements Have Been Updated

Categories: Catching Up
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Published on: November 2, 2020

Summary of changes to AETA Certification Program

The Certification Program has undergone two significant changes that every certified individual needs to understand and plan for. These have been approved by the board of directors and go into effect immediately.

  • 1. Certification cycle has changed from three to five years.

a.) Each individual’s certification cycle has been extended by two years. No matter where you are in your old three-year cycle, it will be extended. If it expired on December 31, 2019, the new expiration will be December 31, 2021.

b.) For continuing education purposes, you will now need 50 credits in your five-year cycle, 30 of which must come from attendance at AETA annual conferences. Each annual conference has a   value of 10 credits. The remaining credits may come from a variety of sources, which are outlined in the certification guidelines.

  • 2. Random inspection of certified members has been discontinued.

a.) Random inspection has been replaced with an inspection session that will occur each year at the annual conference. Attendance will be limited to approximately one fifth of the number of certified individuals. It will be an interactive format where representative examples of labeling and paperwork from each individual will be peer reviewed in small groups and at the whole session. If an unsatisfactory compliance with accepted protocol is determined during this session and not corrected, a site inspection may be generated.  

b.) Each individual will be responsible for attending one of these inspection sessions during their five-year cycle. Sign-up for this event will be announced well in advance, and priority will be given for a period of time to those people in the last year of their cycle. After that deadline, it will be first come, first served.

We hope these changes will help people with unforeseen conflicts during the annual convention and allow more flexibility in scheduling. If we all go into the new inspection session with a positive attitude and allow it to be a learning experience, we feel it will help our entire industry with uniformity and the image we project to the world.

2020 Fall Certification Exam Follow-up

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Published on: November 2, 2020

The AETA certification committee would like to express our gratitude to Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine and the embryo transfer staff for hosting our fall 2020 Examination. They went above and beyond in making our experience very pleasant in the midst of a chaotic time, and provided us a professional atmosphere to accomplish our mission. Thank you; your help is appreciated very much.

AETA 2019 Statistics Survey Results Available

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Published on: November 2, 2020

Winter is Coming!

Categories: Practice Tips
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Published on: November 2, 2020

Summer has been a HOT ONE in most places this year. Beware; Mother Nature has a way of balancing things out. The weather forecasters predict a cold winter in the northern United States, and a mild one in the southern United States. These are the same people that only predict a hurricane’s path with any accuracy within 24 hours. Go figure!

You find yourself driving down a snowy road. The wind is howling, and the snow is sideways. The temperature seems to drop every minute. Finally, you reach your destination an hour late. Clients will be coming soon for a long day of aspirations. As you unload all your equipment, set up the lab, you realize that you forgot to turn on your incubator. When you do turn it on, it says negative 10 degrees Celsius.

Aspirations are supposed to start in the next few minutes. What do you do?

The first thing I do is pull out my $15 portable hair blow dryer. Then I style my curly locks perfectly, because I always want to look my best for my clients. My friend and classmate, John Heizer, taught me this. Appearances are everything. John likes to volunteer a lot of hair styling tips. It’s his specialty. Also, you should know he hasn’t had a single hair on his head since we graduated in 1985. Go figure!

After my styling session, I then use the blow dryer to rapidly warm the incubator. The convection effect of the blow dryer will bring any cold incubator up to temperature in a matter of minutes. After warming your incubator, you can use it to drive the condensation off your cold microscope or your ultrasound, and even warm your boots. Ready to go in minutes for a day of client-pleasing aspirations.

Go figure!! Gary R. Hash, DVM

Embryo Evaluation Survey Follow-up

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Published on: November 2, 2020

The link below is a follow-up to the embryo evaluation survey sent out by AETA and conducted by Lincoln Memorial University with the evaluations at the time the images were captured. 

https://lmu.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cHo9ieqA5iIhqKN

Didactic Assisted Reproductive Techniques Experiences for Veterinary Students at Lincoln Memorial University

Categories: Evidence-Based ET
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Published on: November 2, 2020

J Gibbons, P Gibbons, and L Miller

The faculty and staff at Lincoln Memorial University, College of Veterinary Medicine are committed to education and producing Day 1 ready veterinarians competent in all fields. As a distributive model of education, LMU-CVM students receive real-world training opportunities on sheep, goat, and dairy and beef cattle operations in southwest Virginia and eastern Tennessee during their program. Reproductive physiology, estrous cycle manipulation, and specialized assisted reproductive techniques, such as artificial insemination, embryo transfer, transrectal ultrasonography and palpation, and transvaginal ultrasound-guided follicular aspiration are part of the Theriogenology Core and Elective courses. Material specific to multiple species is delivered by experts in the field (either by faculty or an adjunct) during lecture experiences, with most of the laboratories focusing on cattle. These laboratories consist of breeding soundness examinations, live cow palpation and ultrasound, palpation of pregnant and not pregnant excised reproductive tracts and ovaries, and either commercially available or in-house developed silicone models. LMU-CVM also offers a variety of wet labs focused on bovine embryo evaluation and handling, mock embryo transfer, and recovery experiences using excised reproductive tracts, as well as an Artificial Insemination Certification course. Advanced opportunities include Food Animal procedures and bovine palpation electives (beef and dairy cattle) and a Large Animal specific rotation at the DeBusk Veterinary Teaching Campus. Research opportunities involve in vivo and in vitro approaches to addressing basic and applied reproductive physiology questions. Examples include increasing the efficacy and effectiveness of assisted reproductive techniques, especially embryo transfer in cattle, short term incubation of bovine embryos, evaluation of the role of zinc in in vitro embryo production, dynamics of the bovine maternal to embryonic genome control transition, computer assisted semen analysis, and online and in person bovine embryo evaluation. Students from LMU-CVM have applied and received competitive travel grants to attend the AETA annual conference in 2017, 2018, and 2019 (2020 conference was virtual) and have been very active in recent Society for Theriogenology in-person and virtual conferences.

Effect of Supplemental Trace Minerals on Standard and Novel Measures of Bull Fertility

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Published on: November 2, 2020

T. W. Geary – a2, R. C. Waterman – a, M. L. Van Emon – b, C. R. Ratzburg – c, S. Lake – c, B. A. Eik – a, D. R. Armstrong – a, A. L. Zezeski – a, and J. S. Heldt – d

aUSDA-ARS, Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory, Miles City, MT 59301; bDepartment of Animal and Range Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717; cDepartment of Animal Sciences, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY; dMicronutrients USA LLC, 2601 Fortune Circle Drive E. Suite 200C, Indianapolis, IN 46241

Abstract

Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of trace mineral supplementation on traditional and novel measures of bull fertility. In experiment 1, 37 mature bulls received one of three dietary supplements daily for 71 d: 1) Supplement without Cu, Zn, and Mn (CON); 2) Supplement with Cu, Zn, and Mn sulfate (SULF); and 3) Supplement with basic Cu chloride, and Zn and Mn hydroxychloride (CHLR). In experiment 2, 128 Angus or Angus-Hereford calves were maintained on a growing diet for 75 d (year 1) or 119 d (year 2) in Calan gate equipped pens without mineral supplementation. Bulls (n = 32 head/treatment) received one of four trace mineral supplements daily for 84 d: 1) Zn with no Cu (ZN), 2) Cu with no Zn (CU), 3) Cu and Zn (ZNCU), or 4) no Cu or Zn (CON). Fertility measures included a breeding soundness examination (BSE) and novel fertility measures conducted using flow cytometry. In mature bulls, final liver Zn concentration was positively correlated (P = 0.02) with sperm concentration (r = 0.31) and tended (P = 0.06) to be negatively correlated with acrosome damage (r = -0.39). Peripubertal bulls receiving ZNCU had greater ADG than CU bulls (P = 0.05). Each BSE and novel fertility component improved from d 0 to 84 in peripubertal bulls and were not affected (P > 0.10) by mineral supplementation. Bulls that received no supplement (CON) had greater (P < 0.01) percentage of sperm with distal midpiece reflex and Dag defect in their ejaculates. Sperm viability after 30 min of incubation were not affected by trace mineral supplementation, but after 3 h incubation, sperm viability tended to differ (P = 0.06) between treatments and tended to be less for CON bulls compared to ZNCU bulls. Among contrast comparisons, trace mineral supplemented bulls had greater (P < 0.05) percentage of viable sperm at 3 h post collection and reactive oxygen resistant sperm than CON bulls. Addition of Zn to trace mineral containing Cu (ZNCU) improved (P < 0.05) percentage of sperm in the ejaculate with high mitochondrial energy potential and viable sperm with intact acrosome membrane. In summary, it appears the homeostasis mechanisms for bull trace mineral maintenance are extremely efficient and mineral supplementation of mature and peripubertal bulls did not have major improvements in any laboratory or chute-side measures of bull fertility, however bulls exposed to breeding or in environments with diet antagonists might respond differently.

Out of Season Artificial Insemination and Embryo Transfer Results in Ewes: A Field Trial

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Published on: November 2, 2020

B Price, T Mittleider, S Collins, P Gibbons, and J Gibbons

College of Veterinary Medicine, Lincoln Memorial University, Harrogate, TN

Introduction: 

Ewes are seasonally polyestrous short-day breeders with an estrous cycle of approximately 16 – 17 days.  In the northern hemisphere ewes have active estrous cycles and are naturally receptive to rams from late September to late December when there is less than 12 hours of daylength.  However, progressive sheep breeders often prefer to breed sheep earlier in the year, during periods where there is more than twelve hours of daylength, (July and August) in order to have lambs that are appropriate to target specific show markets.  In order to facilitate this out of season breeding and accelerate genetic gain, producers rely on Assisted Reproductive Techniques such as Laparoscopic Artificial Insemination (LAI), ovarian hyper-stimulation, embryo collection from valuable embryo donors, and embryo transfer (ET) into synchronized recipients (1,2,3.)  This field trial was conducted during late July through early August in southwest Virginia (latitude 36-38’12” N), during a daylight period of about 14 hours. Pregnancy rates of ewes bred by means of AI were compared to those that underwent ET.

Ovine Embryos

Categories: Evidence-Based ET
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Published on: November 2, 2020

In vivo (flush) produced ovine embryos

By Dr Tad Thompson and Dr Leonardo Fernandes – Reproduction Specialty Group Inc. – Lebanon, IN

Hatching Blastocysts

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Published on: November 2, 2020

Day 7 in vitro produced bovine hatching blastocysts.

By Dr Daniela Demetrio – Ruann Genetics – Riverdale, CA

7 & 7 Synch: An Estrus Synchronization Protocol for Postpartum Beef Cows

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Published on: November 2, 2020

Overview


Researchers at the University of Missouri recently
evaluated a new protocol for synchronization of estrus
among postpartum beef cows. This protocol was found
to be highly effective both for cows receiving embryo
transfer (ET) and cows receiving fixed-time artificial
insemination (AI). Extensive field trials with 7 & 7
Synch observed improvements in the proportion of
cows expressing estrus and in the proportion of cows
becoming pregnant to embryo transfer or to AI.

How can we improve embryo production and pregnancy outcomes of Holstein embryos produced in vitro? (12 years of practical results at a California dairy farm)

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Published on: November 2, 2020

Daniela Garcia Borges Demetrio, 1 ,* Eduardo Benedetti, 2 Clarice Garcia Borges Demetrio, 3 Julio Fonseca, 1 Mayara Oliveira, 1 Alvaro Magalhaes, 1 and Ricarda Maria dos Santos 4

1RuAnn Genetics, Riverdale, CA, United States
2Arizona Dairy Co, Mesa, AZ, United States
3Escola Superior de Agricultura “Luiz de Queiroz”, Universidade do Estado de São Paulo, Piracicaba, SP, Brasil
4Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG, Brasil

Abstract


Genomic evaluations have revolutionized dairy cattle breeding, and the demand for embryos produced from very young heifers with high genetic merit has increased over time. The combination of low oocyte recovery, young age of donors, and milk production status can make the in vitro embryo production (IVP) of Holstein cattle incredibly challenging. Several factors need to be coordinated to obtain a live calf from an IVP embryo, but the quality of the oocyte at the start of the process is one of the key factors. Aspects related to oocyte quality, laboratory quality control, embryo quality and recipient selection are addressed here, based on the measures that the RuAnn Genetics Laboratory (Riverdale, California, USA) adopted in the last 12 years, with the goal of improving production of live, healthy calves from Holstein embryos. Follicular wave synchronization and stimulation with follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) is necessary to improve oocyte quality and consequently embryo production. Laboratory quality control and the use of high-quality supplies are essential to reduce variability in production and facilitate identification of other factors that might interfere with embryo production. High pregnancy rates can be achieved with good quality embryos selected at optimal time and stage of development, transferred by an experienced embryo transfer (ET) technician, to well managed recipients 7 or 8 days after estrus. Attention to detail at every step of the process is crucial to success.
Keywords: embryo, Holstein, in vitro production, pregnancy, recipient.

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One-step automated bioprinting-based method for cumulus-oocyte complex microencapsulation for 3D in vitro maturation

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Published on: November 2, 2020

Antonella Mastrorocco1¤a, Ludovica Cacopardo2, Nicola Antonio Martino1¤b, Diana Fanelli3, Francesco Camillo3, Elena Ciani1, Bernard A. J. Roelen4, Arti Ahluwalia2,5☯, Maria Elena Dell’Aquila1☯

1 Department of Biosciences, Biotechnologies and Biopharmaceutics, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy; 2 Research Centre E. Piaggio, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 3 Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 4 Department of Clinical Sciences, Embryology, Anatomy and Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 5 Department of Information Engineering, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy

☯ These authors contributed equally to this work.
¤a Current address: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Teramo, Teramo, Italy
¤b Current address: Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy

Abstract

Three-dimensional in vitro maturation (3D IVM) is a promising approach to improve IVM efficiency as it could prevent cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) flattening and preserve its structural and functional integrity. Methods reported to date have low reproducibility and validation studies are limited. In this study, a bioprinting based production process for generating microbeads containing a COC (COC-microbeads) was optimized and its validity tested in a large animal model (sheep). Alginate microbeads were produced and characterized for size, shape and stability under culture conditions. COC encapsulation had high efficiency and reproducibility and cumulus integrity was preserved. COC-microbeads underwent IVM, with COCs cultured in standard 2D IVM as controls. After IVM, oocytes were analyzed for nuclear chromatin configuration, bioenergetic/oxidative status and transcriptional activity of genes biomarker of mitochondrial activity (TFAMATP6ATP8) and oocyte developmental competence (KHDC3NLRP5OOEP and TLE6). The 3D system supported oocyte nuclear maturation more efficiently than the 2D control (P<0.05). Ooplasmic mitochondrial activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation ability were increased (P<0.05). Up-regulation of TFAMATP6 and ATP8 and down-regulation of KHDC3NLRP5 expression were observed in 3D IVM. In conclusion, the new bioprinting method for producing COC-microbeads has high reproducibility and efficiency. Moreover, 3D IVM improves oocyte nuclear maturation and relevant parameters of oocyte cytoplasmic maturation and could be used for clinical and toxicological applications.

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Sperm DNA Integrity and Male Fertility in Farm Animals: A Review

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Published on: November 2, 2020

Arumugam Kumaresan1*, Mohua Das Gupta1, Tirtha Kumar Datta2 and Jane M. Morrell3

  • 1Theriogenology Laboratory, Southern Regional Station of National Dairy Research Institute (ICAR), Bengaluru, India
  • 2Animal Genomics Laboratory, National Dairy Research Institute (ICAR), Karnal, India
  • 3Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden

The accurate prediction of male fertility is of major economic importance in the animal breeding industry. However, the results of conventional semen analysis do not always correlate with field fertility outcomes. There is evidence to indicate that mammalian fertilization and subsequent embryo development depend, in part, on the inherent integrity of the sperm DNA. Understanding the complex packaging of mammalian sperm chromatin and assessment of DNA integrity could potentially provide a benchmark in clinical infertility. In the era of assisted reproduction, especially when in-vitro fertilization or gamete intrafallopian transfer or intracytoplasmic sperm injection is used, assessment of sperm DNA integrity is important because spermatozoa are not subjected to the selection process occurring naturally in the female reproductive tract. Although sperm DNA integrity testing measures a significant biological parameter, its precise role in the infertility evaluation in farm animals remains unclear. In this review, the earlier findings on sperm DNA integrity in relation to male fertility are compiled and analyzed. Furthermore, the causes and consequences of sperm DNA damage are described, together with a review of advances in methods for detection of sperm DNA damage, and the prognostic value of sperm DNA quality on male fertility.

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AETA President’s Report – Summer 2020

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Published on: August 13, 2020

Hello,

I suspect that as you read this newsletter you may have some of the same feelings that I have. I am finding that the summer is flying by and I am not sure where June and July went. Many of us spend a great deal of time looking out our windshield as we move down the road every day. My thoughts have been that these are interesting times that we live in.

Many of you have reached out to the AETA board, and I appreciate that. We have taken your thoughts and concerns and tried to create lemonade from lemons this year. Soon, information regarding registration for this year’s joint virtual conference will be on the AETA website with details about the schedule and content. Our intention is to deliver meaningful continuing education opportunities as well as satisfy the certification requirement with flexibility at a reasonable cost. 

We will have sessions available for downloading at your convenience as well as three sessions that will be offered live, including chat interaction with the speaker. These three live sessions will be recorded for viewing at your convenience as well. There will also be a virtual business meeting that will include the election of board members. I encourage you all to try to make the business meeting a priority for attendance.  

The registration fees for the virtual conference reflect the board’s efforts to control cost and pass that value on to the membership and sponsors. These are uncertain times and we do not want the cost of the meeting to be a barrier if possible. The AETA board is also mindful of the fact that this could be an opportunity to reach new members on a different platform. With that in mind, we will offer the option to apply the registration fee for the 2020 virtual conference to an equivalent discount for 2021 AETA membership if you desire. Please share the word with anyone who might be interested.

The last aspect of the revised convention proceedings I want to discuss is a change in certification requirements. The board has changed the requirements for conference attendance to 3 out of 5 years, which was previously 2 out of 3 years. This recommendation from the certification committee is meant to reflect the logistics related to this year’s virtual convention as well as the convention in Canada next year. We are also waiving the newly established “in-person” recertification that was to be introduced this year and was meant to replace the on-site random recertification inspections. 

This year’s virtual proceedings are an opportunity to try something new and see what happens. I look forward to your participation.

Thank you,

Matthew Dorshorst, MS DVM

AETA President

Save the date for the 2020 AETA-CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Virtual Meeting!

Categories: Annual Meeting
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Published on: August 13, 2020

The 2020 AETA-CETA/ACTE Joint Annual Meeting will be held virtually beginning on October 6th.  You must register before October 6th to get access to the meeting content.

All of the scientific, sponsor, and CE information can be found on the AETA Annual Convention page as it becomes available. Check back often!

The convention will feature two types of sessions: keynote addresses and prerecorded sessions.

Keynote addresses will be live sessions via Zoom, where participants will see the content and interact with the speakers in real time. Once the keynote addresses have concluded, a link to the content will be posted.

Prerecorded sessions will be made available via a link on the AETA convention page at 12:01 am (CDT) on Tuesday, October 6. During the times on the schedule, speakers will be available to chat via Zoom about their presentations and answer any questions you may have.

All sessions will have a quiz that participants must participate in and pass with a score of at least 70% to receive continuing education (CE) credits.

Please note that speakers will only be available for discussion during their scheduled time. Participants who register before October 6th can view sessions and take the accompanying RACE quizzes until December 31st.

You must register before October 6th to get access to the meeting content.

AETA Certification Requirements and 2020 Exam Update

Categories: Board of Directors
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Published on: August 13, 2020

CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UPDATE

The AETA Board of Directors voted to remove the requirement for random inspections of certified members from the current guidelines, starting immediately:

IV. CERTIFICATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

D. Inspection and Noncompliance

2. RANDOM: Inspections of any certified practitioner’s ETB may be done at any time under the direction of the Board of Directors and the CAO.

and replace it with a NEW requirement (that would not start until the fall meeting in 2021):

D. Inspection, Compliance, and Noncompliance

2. CERTIFICATION SESSION: 20% of certified members will be required to attend a mandatory group certification session at the annual meeting. Thus, every certified member would attend one session during his/her cycle.

2020 CERTIFICATION EXAM AND EXAM RETAKE UPDATE

People seeking to sit for the 2020 Certification Exam and Practicum will still be able to voluntarily do so this year at the Iowa State University (ISU) College of Veterinary Medicine in Ames, Iowa, on Saturday, September 26, in person. There may be a limit to the number of examinees due to ISU restrictions on groups, plus examinees will be asked to sign waivers of liability to hold harmless the host and the AETA.

Please visit the AETA Certification guidelines for more information on how to complete and submit your application.

Any recent certification candidate that needs to retake a portion(s) of the certification exam needs to contact AETA headquarters (aeta@assochq.org) or Glenn Engelland (glennengelland@gmail.com), Certification Committee chair, to schedule a live Zoom conference retake.

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